Home > AIR TICKETING
AIR TICKETING

E-tickets in the airline industry were devised in about 1994,[ and have now largely replaced the older multi-layered paper ticketing systems. Since 1 June 2008, it has been mandatory for IATA members to use e-ticketing. Where paper tickets are still available, some airlines charge a fee for issuing paper tickets.

When a reservation is confirmed, the airline keeps a record of the booking in its computer reservations system. Customers can print out or may be provided with a copy of a e-ticket itinerary receipt which contains the record locator or reservation number and the e-ticket number. It is possible to print multiple copies of an e-ticket itinerary receipt.

Besides providing itinerary details, an e-ticket itinerary receipt also contains:

  • An official ticket number (including the airline’s 3-digit ticketing code,[ a 4-digit form number, a 6-digit serial number, and sometimes a check digit).
  • Carriage terms and conditions, (or at least a reference to them)
  • Fare and tax details, including fare calculation details and some additional data such as tour codes. The exact cost might not be stated, but a “fare basis” code will always identify the fare used.
  • A short summary of fare restrictions, usually specifying only whether change or refund are permitted but not the penalties to which they are subject.
  • Form of payment.
  • Issuing office.
  • Baggage allowance.